Tag Archives: CDC

Enterovirus D68

Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is not a new virus, but it has been getting more people sick this year.  Children are at higher risk, because they may not have been exposed to this virus yet and do not have immunity built up against it.  Children with asthma may have greater risk of developing a more severe respiratory illness from the virus.

Signs of symptoms of EV-D68

Mild symptoms may include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches.

Severe symptoms may include wheezing and difficulty breathing.

Call immediately if your child develops difficulty breathing or if after 5 days your child is getting worse rather than better.

How to stay healthy (from the CDC website)

Woman washing hands with soapWashing hands correctly is the most important thing you can do!

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Washing hands correctly is the most important thing you can do to stay healthy.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact, such as kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils, with people who are sick.
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or shirt sleeve, not your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick and keep sick children out of school.

If your child has asthma

  • Discuss and update your child’s asthma action plan with his or her doctor.
  • Make sure your child takes his or her prescribed asthma medications as directed, especially long-term control medication(s).
  • Make sure your child knows to keep asthma reliever medication with him or her or has access to it at all times.
  • Get your child a flu vaccine, since flu and other respiratory infections can trigger an asthma attack.
  • If your child develops new or worsening asthma symptoms, follow the steps of his or her asthma action plan. If symptoms do not go away, call your child’s doctor right away.
  • Make sure caregiver(s) and/or teacher(s) are aware of the child’s condition, and that they know how to help if the child experiences any symptoms related to asthma.
  • Call your child’s doctor if he or she is having difficulty breathing, if you feel you are unable to control symptoms, or if symptoms are getting worse.

Ebola – information from the CDC

Ebola is a viral disease that is spread through contact with bodily fluids (i.e. pee, poop, vomit, blood) on the mucus membranes (eyes, mouth, nose). A person with symptoms of Ebola must have had contact with a person with known Ebola or travel to an area with active Ebola in the last 21 days.

Symptoms of Ebola include fever greater than 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit, and additional symptoms such as severe headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, or unexplained bleeding.

The risk of getting Ebola in the United States is very low. That risk is increased if you travel to areas in West Africa where Ebola is being transmitted. Even then risk is divided into high and low risk by the CDC as follows:

A high risk exposure includes any of the following:
•Percutaneous (e.g., needle stick) or mucous membrane exposure to blood or body fluids of EVD patient
•Direct skin contact with, or exposure to blood or body fluids of, an EVD patient without appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
•Processing blood or body fluids of a confirmed EVD patient without appropriate PPE or standard biosafety precautions
•Direct contact with a dead body without appropriate PPE in a country where an EVD outbreak is occurring.

Low risk exposures

A low risk exposure includes any of the following
•Household contact with an EVD patient
•Other close contact with EVD patients in health care facilities or community settings. Close contact is defined as a.being within approximately 3 feet (1 meter) of an EVD patient or within the patient’s room or care area for a prolonged period of time (e.g., health care personnel, household members) while not wearing recommended personal protective equipment (i.e., standard, droplet, and contact precautions; see Infection Prevention and Control Recommendations)
•Having direct brief contact (e.g., shaking hands) with an EVD patient while not wearing recommended personal protective equipment.

Here is the link to the CDC site for more information.

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/index.html